The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It

If the capabilities of this technology doesn’t scare you enough, the idea that Peter Thiel is helping finance it should.

A little-known start-up helps law enforcement match photos of unknown people to their online images — and “might lead to a dystopian future or something,” a backer says. Until recently, Hoan Ton-That’s greatest hits included an obscure iPhone game and an app that let people put Donald Trump’s distinctive yellow hair on their own photos.

Read the full article at www.nytimes.com.

Mobile Carrier Customer Service Ushers in SIM-Swap Fraud

It’s pretty ridiculous that you can do everything right to protect your account, but you cell carrier can’t ensure their staff are trained well enough to avoid social engineering. Or maybe they need to pay them enough so they’re not as open to bribes.

Weak challenge questions by customer service reps make it easy for fraudsters to hijack a phone line and bypass 2FA to breach accounts. Mobile carriers have left the door wide open to SIM-swap attacks, particularly when it comes to prepaid accounts, researchers have found.

Fun with Charts: Why Apple’s Services and Wearables are in the spotlight

Looks like the “iPhone company” is in trouble. 🤔

Every three months, we get to peer inside Apple’s business via the financial disclosures that are mandatory for American public corporations. (The company will reveal the specifics of its holiday quarter on January 28.)

Read the full article at sixcolors.com.

7 Problems Y2K Actually Caused

I remember having to cancel my plans to celebrate New Year’s in Sydney, Australia so I could stay at work on New Year’s Eve. After tons of hardware and software updates, I had to monitor the desktop computing environment for problems. There were none. I have yet to visit Australia, though.

Remember Y2K? In the relatively early years of computer programming, many systems were designed to categorize dates by the last two digits of a year, ignoring the “19” at the start of the number to save memory space.

Read the full article at www.mentalfloss.com.

DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials Returns to Safari – The Mac Observer

F*ck Google. Search with privacy.

DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials is a Safari extension that blocks trackers and provides a privacy dashboard for each website you visit. Due to changes in Safari 12 the company had to remove and retool the extension, but now it’s back with Safari 13.

Read the full article at www.macobserver.com.

Congress Looking Into Anticompetitive Behavior in the Digital Library Market

It’s absurd how publishers are abusing their position to impose restrictive and expensive terms on public libraries. This will only widen the digital divide.

House Judiciary Committee chairman Jerrold Nadler, at a hearing on competition in digital markets last week. The American Library Association (ALA) has delivered a written report to the House Judiciary Committee telling lawmakers that “unfair behavior by digital market actors,” including Amazon and some major publishers, is “doing concrete harm to libraries.”

Read the full article at Publishers Weekly.

This Cassette Tape-Based Navigation System From 1971 Is Kind Of Brilliant

Following on my earlier post about Apple Maps, here’s some perspective on how far we’ve come.

This clip from a 1971 episode of the BBC television show Tomorrow’s World has so many appealing details to me, most notably the featuring of a lovely UK-spec 1962 Volkswagen Beetle, but the true star of it is the remarkably forward-thinking navigation system the Beetle is fitted with.

Read the full article at jalopnik.com.

Apple is rebuilding Maps from the ground up

I’ve actually been using Apple Maps without issue for quite a while, but this would certainly be a welcome improvement.

’m not sure if you’re aware, but the launch of Apple Maps went poorly. After a rough first impression, an apology from the CEO, several years of patching holes with data partnerships and some glimmers of light with long-awaited transit directions and improvements in business, parking and place data, Apple Maps is still not where it needs to be to be considered a world class service.

Read the full article at techcrunch.com.