DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials Returns to Safari – The Mac Observer

F*ck Google. Search with privacy.

DuckDuckGo Privacy Essentials is a Safari extension that blocks trackers and provides a privacy dashboard for each website you visit. Due to changes in Safari 12 the company had to remove and retool the extension, but now it’s back with Safari 13.

Read the full article at www.macobserver.com.

Congress Looking Into Anticompetitive Behavior in the Digital Library Market

It’s absurd how publishers are abusing their position to impose restrictive and expensive terms on public libraries. This will only widen the digital divide.

House Judiciary Committee chairman Jerrold Nadler, at a hearing on competition in digital markets last week. The American Library Association (ALA) has delivered a written report to the House Judiciary Committee telling lawmakers that “unfair behavior by digital market actors,” including Amazon and some major publishers, is “doing concrete harm to libraries.”

Read the full article at Publishers Weekly.

This Cassette Tape-Based Navigation System From 1971 Is Kind Of Brilliant

Following on my earlier post about Apple Maps, here’s some perspective on how far we’ve come.

This clip from a 1971 episode of the BBC television show Tomorrow’s World has so many appealing details to me, most notably the featuring of a lovely UK-spec 1962 Volkswagen Beetle, but the true star of it is the remarkably forward-thinking navigation system the Beetle is fitted with.

Read the full article at jalopnik.com.

Apple is rebuilding Maps from the ground up

I’ve actually been using Apple Maps without issue for quite a while, but this would certainly be a welcome improvement.

’m not sure if you’re aware, but the launch of Apple Maps went poorly. After a rough first impression, an apology from the CEO, several years of patching holes with data partnerships and some glimmers of light with long-awaited transit directions and improvements in business, parking and place data, Apple Maps is still not where it needs to be to be considered a world class service.

Read the full article at techcrunch.com.

Critical PGP and S/MIME bugs can reveal encrypted e-mails. Uninstall now

Happy Monday.

The Internet’s two most widely used methods for encrypting e-mail–PGP and S/Mime–are vulnerable to hacks that can reveal the plaintext of encrypted messages, a researcher warned late Sunday night. He went on to say there are no reliable fixes and to advise anyone who uses either encryption standard for sensitive communications to remove them immediately from e-mail clients.

Read the full article at arstechnica.com.

Think You’ve Got Your Credit Freezes Covered? Think Again.

This is infuriating! Equifax has a handy little backdoor way of getting around credit freezes to still make money off of our data. (Not to mention the other companies that have easy access without much oversight.)

I spent a few days last week speaking at and attending a conference on responding to identity theft. The forum was held in Florida, one of the major epicenters for identity fraud complaints in United States.

Read the full article at krebsonsecurity.com.

Robert N. Hall, 96, Whose Inventions Are Everywhere, Is Dead

It’s sad that some who influenced so much is not well known.

Robert N. Hall’s legacy can be found at almost every checkout counter — that little red blinking laser scanner that reads bar codes on milk cartons, boxes of light bulbs, price tags dangling from a new jacket and just about everything else that can be bought in a store.

Read the full article at www.nytimes.com.